Official, confirmed, verified "You are the umpire" thread

Parth D

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This is very simple.... A ball bowled is never dead until called by the Umpires. Hence, you award runs or a wicket or any event that happens until the ball is declared dead.

In case, had the ball hit the stumps the non-struker would be out.
I remember one such instance form 2007 T20 World Cup where Sreesanth did the same vs Australia and he did struck the bails, however the umpire didn't adjudged the batsman out.
 

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I remember one such instance form 2007 T20 World Cup where Sreesanth did the same vs Australia and he did struck the bails, however the umpire didn't adjudged the batsman out.
Now we are not aware whether the ball was declared dead in such case. Also the rules may have changed over time!

Ian Bell's run out is all I could remember.
 

icyman

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What if the World T20 Final were to end in a tie. Assume it is impacted by rain. During the 12th over of the chase, rain comes down heavily. At this stage though, both team is tied on the Par score- in essence it is a tie. What happens next? Cause the minimum number of overs has been completed, the game can be deemed as complete. Under ICC regulations though, a tie must be played out until there is a clear winner. The conditions do not permit this to happen- do you share the trophy?
 

Parth D

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What if the World T20 Final were to end in a tie. Assume it is impacted by rain. During the 12th over of the chase, rain comes down heavily. At this stage though, both team is tied on the Par score- in essence it is a tie. What happens next? Cause the minimum number of overs has been completed, the game can be deemed as complete. Under ICC regulations though, a tie must be played out until there is a clear winner. The conditions do not permit this to happen- do you share the trophy?
Boundary coun.... [This post has been truncated by New Zealand hackers]
 
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Now we are not aware whether the ball was declared dead in such case. Also the rules may have changed over time!

Ian Bell's run out is all I could remember.
It was fair enough for Dhoni to offer calling him back. The mistake was by Ian Bell for not declining this offer. Since it was the fault of the batters. The ball was live the whole time.
 

qpeedore

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What if the World T20 Final were to end in a tie. Assume it is impacted by rain. During the 12th over of the chase, rain comes down heavily. At this stage though, both team is tied on the Par score- in essence it is a tie. What happens next? Cause the minimum number of overs has been completed, the game can be deemed as complete. Under ICC regulations though, a tie must be played out until there is a clear winner. The conditions do not permit this to happen- do you share the trophy?
Invalid. The par score is not one to be tied. You must be above that score for a victory. In the case of a team making the par score it's a win for the team bowling second.

EDIT: as to the other issue, the ball is generally declared dead when it settles into the hands of the keeper or a fielder, or has crossed the boundary line or at the fall of a wicket. The definition of "settled" may be an issue though.
 

Parth D

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Invalid. The par score is not one to be tied. You must be above that score for a victory. In the case of a team making the par score it's a win for the team bowling second.
Nope. It's a tie and not a win for the bowling team.

 

icyman

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Another one- rather morbid one.

Say, a batsman is facing a delivery. As soon as the bowler lets it go, the batsman collapses due to a sun stroke and falls on the stumps, thereby dislodging them. 5 minutes later, the batsman gains consciousness- is the batsman out?

Per MCC laws, the fielder needs to have appealed. Assume that the keeper went up in appeal, but later on, trailled off. what happens here?
 

Parth D

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Another one- rather morbid one.

Say, a batsman is facing a delivery. As soon as the bowler lets it go, the batsman collapses due to a sun stroke and falls on the stumps, thereby dislodging them. 5 minutes later, the batsman gains consciousness- is the batsman out?

Per MCC laws, the fielder needs to have appealed. Assume that the keeper went up in appeal, but later on, trailled off. what happens here?
IRL basis, I have seen many players get bowled/hit wicket and no one from the fielding team has appealed. An appeal is generally made when the clarity of a wicket is unknown, like in case of an LBW or an outside-edge catch. Whereas, when it the wicket is clearly noticable, an appeal is not often established since everyone by default assumes that a wicket is taken.

Now coming to the out or not out in this case, by law the batsman is out since he has struck his own wicket by whatever means. What can happen is, the opponent team's captain has the power to withdraw the wicket if he wants. As we have seen in numerous instances where fielding captains have withdrawn wickets. MS Dhoni withdrawing Ian Bell's wicket (Praveen Kumar infamous runout incident). Sehwag withdrawing Lahiru Thirimanne's wicket (Ashwin had mankad him). Micheal Clarke withdrawing Shikhar Dhawan's runout during his debut match (Ball has slipped from Starc during his run up and accidently hit non-striker end stumps while Dhawan was out of his crease).

So after witnessing the mishap taken place on the field, the fielding captain can withdraw the wicket and allow the batsman to play again once he gains consciousness.
 

qpeedore

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Nope. It's a tie and not a win for the bowling team.


Hmm. The rules have probably changed and I wasn't aware.

Another one- rather morbid one.

Say, a batsman is facing a delivery. As soon as the bowler lets it go, the batsman collapses due to a sun stroke and falls on the stumps, thereby dislodging them. 5 minutes later, the batsman gains consciousness- is the batsman out?

Per MCC laws, the fielder needs to have appealed. Assume that the keeper went up in appeal, but later on, trailled off. what happens here?

I'd go with what Parth said about this. The fielding captain should ideally withdraw the appeal in the spirit of the game. But the batsman should also retire hurt to get properly treated in any case. I think in the circumstances it wouldn't be unfair for the captain to even withdraw the appeal after the batsman is already in the pavilion and the news of how severe the injury has been made known.
 

Parth D

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Hmm. The rules have probably changed and I wasn't aware.



I'd go with what Parth said about this. The fielding captain should ideally withdraw the appeal in the spirit of the game. But the batsman should also retire hurt to get properly treated in any case. I think in the circumstances it wouldn't be unfair for the captain to even withdraw the appeal after the batsman is already in the pavilion and the news of how severe the injury has been made known.
It is mentioned that the batsman gained consciousness in 5 mins :spy

If that wasn't the case I would have gone your route
 

qpeedore

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It is mentioned that the batsman gained consciousness in 5 mins :spy

If that wasn't the case I would have gone your route
Batman, with all the new rules about concussions etc, you really expect a collapsed player to continue batting after he's revived? Joker does not agree. He's back in the hut almost immediately, even if in all the time it will take for a stretcher to come onto the field he recovers and says he's fine.

If he insists on staying in the middle, the Joker part of me will set a field allowing quick singles. Let him run and collapse again.
 

qpeedore

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1. There is no television referral system in place. A bowler has had a couple of appeals turned down. He asks you why you said not out. Can you tell him why you made your calls?

2. You are fielding at square leg, and the batsman absolutely smashes one into your body. In self defense you throw your arms up and palm the ball away. But with your momentum and whatnot, the ball trickles onto the stumps with the batsmen attempting a third run and it dislodged the bails. The fielders appeal. Is it out?

3. A well-established batsman is off strike. The tail ender sends a sharp catch to the fielder at cover. He snatches it just above the turf, but then immediately (in the same motion) throws it across to the keeper, who finds the good batsman out of his ground. Obvioulsy the fielding team appeals. Who is out?
 

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