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Limiting Piracy of Cricket Games

Discussion in 'Cricket Games General Chat' started by cricket_online, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. Gabe Club Cricketer

    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    Apologies for the long post, but an interesting discussion broke out in the 'PC Troubleshooting' thread which I think it worthy or further comment. This started when a chap in Pakistan questioned the pricing of DBC14 in relation to the economy there.

    Ha, I've been known to talk out of my ass (unintentionally), but I don't think I am in this case. What does the bolded sentence even mean?

    You seem to be suggesting that Steam are taking 100% of the purchase price, which is insane and I don't believe for a second to be the case, because if it is then BAS will never make any money regardless of what they price it at.

    I don't really understand your grasp of costs, either. What costs are there for a digital copy? There's no production cost because there is no physical product. The distribution cost is built into the cut Steam take, so that is accounted for. The only cost is the cut Steam take, and because that is a percentage as Ross has stated, so long as it is less than 100% there will never be a loss, no matter what price it is (be it ?10 or ?50).

    Retail is different, and a fixed price per copy is paid, and any discount is taken from the producers cut rather than the retailers, so it is possible to sell at a loss.

    Now what I suppose could be happening is that Steam say they will take 40% of the launch price as their cut (so, for example, 0.40 x ?35 = ?14 goes to Steam, ?21 to Big Ant Studios) and that 'cut' is then fixed forever/a period of time. In this scenario, then any discount would be taken from the producer's cut - so let's say BAS reduce the price to ?20 - Steam would still want their ?14 under the terms of the original deal, leaving BAS only ?6 per copy (rather than Steam getting 40% of ?20 - i.e. ?8.) But it still wouldn't cost anything extra to do that, it'd only take more to sell to reach their targets. The only way to sell at a loss would be to price it at under ?14 (in this crude example) and then have to pay Steam the difference. And I doubt anybody has ever done that in the history of the service, because it is beyond madness.

    Happy to be proven wrong though, I find it an interesting discussion.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  2. CricketQ20 10 Years at PC Trophy

    CricketQ20
    Lannisters NZ.... KKR AFG... India
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    All he is saying in simple English is

    If Big Ant pays $3000 for 10k physical copies where each copy sells for $60 each Big Ant is ending up paying $5000 for same 10k game for digital copies.

    There is saying if you need luxury you need to pay more and digital copies are luxury, one can easily purchase download no hurrying nothing.

    Anyways an article for you to read

     
  3. The Deadman Survival Games Finalist

    The Deadman
    Survival Games Finalist Lannisters Kings XI AUS.. Hobart Hurricanes KK
    AKA:
    Don Carlo
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    By Indian you mean South Asian ;) well i was a pirate but PC members told me what is piracy and that changed me and now i buy original games :yes but i have to wait till Eid etc :p
     
    barmyarmy said thanks for this.
  4. IceAgeComing Retired Administrator

    IceAgeComing
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    Here's the thing: I think that there is the other extreme where anti-piracy measures to too far and start to annoy customers who buy the game. The big example for me is always-on DRM where even though I buy a single-player game, I can't play it unless I have a perfect internet connection at all times. That's something that I'm not down with: I won't buy a game that has it. I remember Sim City's launch last year: I paid ?50 for a game that I physically couldn't play until I emailed Amazon asking for my money back four days later. This isn't some newly launch MMO: I wanted to play a SINGLE PLAYER game and had paid lots of money to do so; but because EA didn't realise the demand on launch, the servers were at capacity for weeks after release. Sure: SimCity was never cracked (until they patched in offline Single Player), but EA also had tonnes of people who love the franchise who either didn't buy the game or asked for their money back (and got banned from Origin for the privilege). There is the balance of the sales that you lose from making piracy easier (many of whom will not buy the game anyway) and those that you lose from restrictive DRM (which definitely are going to buy your game).

    Its piracy that causes these things though: if people went and pirated SimCity on release then it would only encourage the big companies to add more shitty DRM to their product which makes things worse for the consumer. I think that the Diablo 3, SimCity and Xbox One reactions have shown that the always-on thing is the last straw for people who play video games. Lots of people feel that they should be able to play a product that they've paid lots of money for whenever they wish; and shouldn't be locked out by their internet breaking or similar occurrences.

    Its also open to debate whether DRM actually reduces piracy. Look at the Witcher 2: the version with SecuRom DRM was actually pirated more than the GOG.com DRM-free release: even after the GOG version was released (Source)! There seems to br a shift in two directions: some like EA and Blizzard are moving towards a system where you pay full price for a game that you only can play when they want you to because you control the servers: and will probably be shut off in a few years meaning that people will have paid ?50 for a fancy box and a game they can't play. Others are moving away from the thing because they see it as them spending money on something that doesn't help them in any way, and I think some appreciate that. It'd be interesting to see whether DRM-free releases are pirated any more than games that do have DRM: but that's something that you'd been statisticians to do a proper study in since its a very complex issue.

    To bring this to cricket games: Big Ant seem to have an appropriate solution which is not go to for "traditional" DRM that prevents the game from loading, but DRM that lets you load a broken game. That's probably the best solution overall: make your product work perfectly without making your customer jump through hoops (or require an internet connection) while break things for those who refuse to buy a product. The reckoning will be if (although when is probably the more correct question, unfortunately) a cracked version that removes Big Ant's big bugs is released and whether that gets noticed more than the current broken or fake releases.
     
  5. The Deadman Survival Games Finalist

    The Deadman
    Survival Games Finalist Lannisters Kings XI AUS.. Hobart Hurricanes KK
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    Don Carlo
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    There was a guy who was selling a pirated copy of DBC for 200 Riyals :/ and people were buying it (LOL)

    The REAL one on Steam = 49.99 USD = 187 SAR
    The REAL one (Jarir Bookstore) = Not Available but they told me that it will be available next month for 200 SAR

    Bloody assholes deserve that :D
     
  6. BigAntStudios @Ross

    BigAntStudios
    Big Ant
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    Nice read.

    "No one is entitled to nonconsensual ‘free’ labor from artists, or anyone else for that matter. This should not be a controversial proclamation in 2014."
     
    Chief said thanks for this.
  7. Chief Panel of Selectors

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    Sep 1, 2009
    Aye: that was my favourite line too. :-)
     
    BigAntStudios said thanks for this.
  8. IceAgeComing Retired Administrator

    IceAgeComing
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    I found the bits about availability interesting. We seem to have turned a corner with Steam and other services providing easily accessible, immediate, legitimate downloads of games without the faff that other services foisted: like Adware or limited activations. You also get some innovative ideas like the Humble Bundle which provides a way for developers, especially smaller ones, to get their games in the hands of those that might not

    An example might be the latest one: I just bought the latest Humble weekly bundle because it has WRC 4 in it and I've been eyeing that up for a fair while. I didn't spend a whole lot - around £10 - and got that and a bunch of smaller Indie games that I'll play at some point. If they're good then I'll probably get other games that the people that made them make and thus they get more money. That wouldn't be possible a few years ago - probably not until Steam became a thing - because digital marketplaces weren't designed to allow that sort of thing, and the digital market wasn't that large anyway. Although the developers aren't getting the same share of revenue that they'd get for those who just buy the game (Humble Bundle revenue is generally split between the developers, appointed charities and the site themselves) but they get something from someone who probably wouldn't buy their product anyway because they didn't know about it: and they probably gain a decent share of those in the future. Sure the developers of WRC 4 aren't getting the money that I would have given them had I bought it direct from Steam: but I imagine that they see some benefit from doing it since they wouldn't put it up otherwise...

    In short: buying digital games is now much, much easier than the alternative whereas before Steam it might not have been. It still wasn't right: but now because of Steam and other services, you're intentionally going out of your way to pirate versus the alternative. Buying games is so easy and better value than ever from a consumer perspective that supporting developers is a really easy thing to do.
     
  9. Chief Panel of Selectors

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Mos' Def'. And good shout for the Humble Bundle - I'm an ambassador for GamesAid (Our Mission | GamesAidGamesAid | GamesAid riases funds through the exploits of members of the UK video games industry. PLUG!) and it's a great charity which really benefits from various Humble offers.

    And if you REALLY want to be depressed about piracy, why not read this about one of the first charity bundles, which people were... pirating. Saving a penny -- pirating the Humble Indie Bundle - Wolfire Games Blog
     
  10. MattW Administrator

    MattW
    Admin PlanetCricket Award Winner Melbourne Stars Big Ant
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  11. IceAgeComing Retired Administrator

    IceAgeComing
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    tweaking hell. You can literally pay pennies for a humble bundle and legally own your games, although be a twat while doing so. The fact that people would pirate that is awful!
     
  12. BigAntStudios @Ross

    BigAntStudios
    Big Ant
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    As I've maintained, it's not about price.
     
  13. Madman National Board President

    Madman
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    I reckon a big factor is that it's just easier to pirate a lot of the time so people get into the habit of it and it becomes their main (or only) source of acquiring their games.

    Although in recent years it's improved a lot with Steam (which is 'DRM' but done right) becoming more popular, many PC games used to have annoying DRM, limited activation systems and bloatware like Games for Windows Live, SecuROM, TAGES etc and even Uplay/Rockstar Social Club etc are annoying. The pirated versions would often completely remove the inconvenient DRM and the unnecessary bloatware, as well as offering quick digital distribution, which wasn't a massive thing for PC games until 5 years or so ago.

    I used to torrent games quite often, but as I've matured my mentality has changed and I've stopped doing it, but some developers really didn't help themselves with their implementation of DRM and inferior distribution methods.
     
  14. Kiko_97 National Board President

    Kiko_97
    AKA:
    Kieron
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    "plz upload steamrip with updates thanks as all the updates till 1.09 have bugs for pirates like rain, controllers not working and crashes..." One of my favourite comments on a DBC link... somebody reads the forums
     

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